Freak Accident Sidelines Colts RB Vick Ballard for Season

Running back Vick Ballard of the Indianapolis Colts is done for the season due to a torn ACL in his right knee.Apparently Ballard’s injury was a freak accident at practice and didn’t involve physical contact.“We feel awful for Vick,” Coach Chuck Pagano said. “We’ll deal with it. No one handles adversity like us.”As a result of the injury, Ballard has been placed on the injured reserve list. Ahmad Bradshaw and Donald Brown will be splitting the workload while Ballard is out.The Colts will miss Ballard—he led the Colts in rushing as a rookie with 814 yards and a team-high 63 yards on 13 carries in the first game of the season against the Raiders. read more

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Ohio State mens soccer team moves to top of Big Ten after

Ohio State forward Yaw Amankwa (23) kicks the ball past Maryland defender Chris Odoi-Atsem (28) during a game at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium on Oct. 31, 2015. OSU won, 1-0. Photo Credit: Amanda Etchison | Editor in ChiefMaryland native and junior forward Yaw Amankwa led the No. 23 Ohio State men’s soccer team to a 1-0 shutout victory against Maryland after scoring the game’s lone goal in the final minutes of the first half.“At the beginning of the season we talked about doing something special and these kind of games you always want to play,” Amankwa said. “You want to beat the big boys. They’ve won national championships and we just wanted to prove that we could play with them.”OSU moved back to the top of the Big Ten standings and improved its record to 10-5-2 on the season and 4-2-1 in Big Ten play. Maryland dropped to No. 5 in the conference and fell to 7-5-4 overall and 2-2-3 in conference play with the loss.Saturday night’s victory marked the Buckeyes’ 100th victory at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium.Not only is it the 100th win at the stadium, but the Scarlet and Gray also earned their first win against Maryland in the last three times the two teams met.Maryland lived up to what it is known for, which is its ability to attack and bring physicality to the game. However, the Buckeyes were not intimidated and matched the Terrapins’ physical nature.The first half looked as though it was going to be a scoreless one, as the Buckeyes and the Terrapins battled it out, with both teams not allowing the other to score for much of it.OSU had three great looks, including one in the 10th minute from junior forward Danny Jensen, but his shot was blocked from the near side.Another look came from Amankwa after a feed from Jensen, but his shot missed the net.Finally, in the 13th minute Jensen got the ball, with a good look at the net, but his shot went left of the post.It appeared like the teams would enter the locker room at halftime scoreless but Amankwa had different plans. In the 43rd minute, Amankwa sent in a shot from 18 yards out to the far post, giving the Buckeyes at 1-0 lead heading into halftime. Senior midfielder Kyle Culbertson was credited for the assist.Ohio State midfielder Kyle Culbertson (3), forward Yaw Amankwa (23) and forward Christian Soldat (13) celebrate after scoring a goal against Maryland during a game at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium on Oct. 31, 2015. OSU won, 1-0. Photo Credit: Amanda Etchison | Editor in Chief“I knew the defenders pushed up a lot and I knew Kyle is usually consistent with the flick-ons,” Amankwa said describing the play. “So I was ready for it and he flicked it on and I saw the goalie off his line, then I chipped it and it went in.”Trailing by one, the Terrapins entered the second half firing shots at the Buckeyes, with the visitors holding a 6-4 edge in second-half shots.However, despite Maryland’s plan of attacking the Scarlet and Gray, the Buckeye defense held strong and was able prevent the Terrapins from getting the tying goal.“We knew we were going to have a difficult second half, but the backboard held together and they played very well,” OSU coach John Bluem said.Overall, shots were 13-9 in favor of Maryland, while both teams held a total of eight corner kicks.OSU senior goalkeeper Chris Froschauer had five saves on the night to improve to 10-5-2 overall. The clean sheet was Froschauer’s eighth of the season.The Buckeyes are set to host their final regular-season match against rival Michigan at 7 p.m. on Wednesday at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. read more

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5 things we saw between Ohio State and Michigan

OSU junior running back Ezekiel Elliott (15) runs with the ball in a game against Michigan on Nov. 28 at Michigan Stadium. OSU won, 42-13. Credit: Samantha Hollingshead | Photo EditorANN ARBOR, Mich. — Before No. 8 Ohio State’s commanding 42-13 victory over No. 10 Michigan, The Lantern’s sports editors Ryan Cooper and Kevin Stankiewicz dispensed five things they would be watching for during the game. Here is how those five items played out. Zeke backing up his wordsJunior running back Ezekiel Elliott turned heads across the nation after OSU’s loss to Michigan State for what he said in the postgame press conference. He was critical of the play-calling and the fact he only got 12 carries. Elliott insisted the world would see a different team against the Wolverines.He was right.OSU controlled the game, outgaining Michigan 484 to 364. As for Elliott, he received the extra carries he asked for.He finished the game with 30 carries for 214 yards and two scores. He also passed Eddie George to move into second place all-time on the OSU rushing list.“It’s kind of a dream come true,” Elliott said of eclipsing George’s total. “It’s an honor to continue this running back pedigree at Ohio State.” The St. Louis native was much more involved than he was in the past game, as on the first offensive series he had two touches, which equalled the amount he had in the entire second half against the Spartans. It took only until the Buckeyes’ first drive of the second half for Elliott to eclipse his number of carries from last week. The Michigan defense had been stout against the run for most of the season, but on Saturday, the Buckeyes exposed the unit. On top of Elliott’s fifth career game of more than 200 yards rushing, redshirt sophomore quarterback J.T. Barrett ran for 139 yards and three scores of his own.Barrett also added 113 yards and a touchdown through the air. OSU offensive coordinator and offensive line coach Ed Warinner noted the passing game as one area still to be improved upon. But even so, he was not dwelling on it.“I still would have liked to have had a few more passing yards,” he said. “But for whatever reason that didn’t materialize. But at the end of the day we weren’t worrying about stats. We were worried about one stat — winning the game.” Will there be a rivalry moment?The last time OSU entered Michigan Stadium, there was large scuffle between the two teams after then-freshman Dontre Wilson returned a kickoff. Wilson was ejected, as was former OSU lineman Marcus Hall and Michigan then-sophomore linebacker Royce Jenkins-Stone. On Saturday, there were no ejections or brawls of that magnitude. However, the usual added intensity from the rivalry was on display. The crowd was infusing the airwaves with boisterous boos all afternoon, including during the marching band’s performance of “Script Ohio,” as well as when sophomore linebacker Raekwon McMillan was being helped off the field with an injury. As for the players, they also got involved, most notably near the end of the first half on another kickoff. OSU redshirt freshman safety Malik Hooker and Michigan redshirt junior wide receiver Jehu Chesson got tangled up on a return, wrestling each other to the ground. Additional players, including Wilson, created a huddle where words between the teams were exchanged. Officials dissolved it before it developed into anything larger. Outside of that play, it was a relatively clean edition of The Game. Redshirt junior wide receiver Michael Thomas and redshirt sophomore linebacker Darron Lee both said after the game that there wasn’t too much talking between them and their Wolverine counterparts. “There wasn’t too much jawing,” Lee said. “Sometimes you’ve got to respect (your opponent).” Barrett acknowledged his respect for the Wolverines and the rivalry, but he said it’s more about worrying what his team is doing during the game and not let the emotion of it all affect the performance. He did, however, admit that sometimes emotions can play a part. “Of course there is an appeal to emotion,” Barrett said, ”because we hate each other.” Salt in the woundMichigan redshirt freshman Jabrill Peppers is widely regarded as one of the most talented and versatile players in nation, and he showed why on Saturday. From the get-go, Peppers was all over the field. On the Wolverines’ first offensive possession, the 6-foot-1 Peppers had a 12-yard reception, a 5-yard rush and he threw a pass. As usual, he played his native safety position as well, while also returning punts. Offensively, Peppers finished with nine touches for 54 yards. The Michigan defense struggled to slow the OSU run, but Peppers did his job in the passing game solidly. He finished the game with five solo tackles. His individual efforts weren’t enough, but the New Jersey native showed off his athleticism and playmaking ability throughout the game, backing up all the hype that surrounded him. His performance warranted a mention from Elliott in the postgame press conference. “What Jabrill Peppers does for that team is just phenomenal, being able to play both ways,” Elliott said. “Every time he just touches the ball, you kind of hold your breath.” Peppers is only a redshirt freshman, which means he has plenty more college football ahead of him. As for opponents, that means plenty more holding of breath will occur. Jake Rudock vs. Ohio State’s secondaryMichigan quarterback Jake Rudock had been playing lights-out football coming into Saturday’s contest. Although the Wolverine offense as a whole was limited to just 13 points, the redshirt senior was able to have moderate success. In just about three quarters, Rudock finished the game 19-of-32 for 263 yards and one touchdown. He was not on the field for most of the fourth quarter after being sacked by OSU junior defensive end Joey Bosa. Even though he had about one less quarter of play, it was still his fourth consecutive game of over 250 yards passing.Known for his accuracy and smart decision making, Rudock showed why, consistently fitting the ball into tight windows and finding the open man when they appeared. Unfortunately for coach Jim Harbaugh, the Wolverines could not locate Rudock any help in the ground game, as they only rushed for 57 yards. The Buckeyes were clearly the better team on Saturday, but Rudock did have a solid performance amid the rest of his team’s struggles. Seniors playing their final regular-season gameFor the OSU seniors, their final game in Ohio Stadium did not play out the way they had wished. The same could not be said about their last time playing in The Game. A convincing 42-13 win over their archrival to secure a fourth pair of gold pants will now preside as the backdrop for the seniors’ regular-season careers. Of the 18 seniors on the roster, performances ranged from helmet-sticker-worthy to mundane, even though they still got the win. Senior linebacker Joshua Perry recorded a game-high 10 tackles, while defensive comrade Adolphus Washington was disruptive in the middle, picking up two tackles and a pass breakup. On the other side of the ball, the three seniors on the offensive line, had themselves a day, as they cleared gaping holes for Barrett and Elliott to run through after two shaky drives to begin the game. For the skill-position players, it was slightly less noteworthy. H-back Braxton Miller had four touches for just 12 yards, while tight end Nick Vannett caught just one pass for eight yards.  “It’s awesome,” redshirt junior right guard Pat Elflein said about the seniors. “That’s who we did it for, the seniors, those guys that are leaving … to send them out like that, that’s what it’s about.” read more

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Mens hockey Ohio States opponent Arizona State serves as the face of

Freshman goalie Joey Daccord makes a save against No. 13 Notre Dame in South Bend, Indiana. Credit: Courtesy of Sun Devil AthleticsLast weekend, Ohio State hockey fans watched the Buckeyes skate against the No. 2 Penn State Nittany Lions, a team in college hockey’s national scope less than five seasons as an NCAA Division I program.The Nittany Lions dropped to No. 4 this week after a weekend split with OSU.This Friday, the No. 10 Buckeyes (10-4-4, 2-2 Big Ten) welcome another one of college hockey’s newcomers in Arizona State (7-16-1), currently in its second year of Division I status. The Sun Devils were created in part because of the work of ASU beat reporter Justin Emerson. He had a conversation with ASU Vice President for University Athletics Ray Anderson in July 2014 about the obstacles facing the team if it wanted to move to Division I, following its club-level national championship just a few months prior, according to an article published by Sports Illustrated.   All the program needed was money, somewhere between $30 million and $40 million.A donor group, headed by Don Mullett, a Wisconsin-based businessman and the father of an Arizona State hockey player, was quickly formed after the publication of Emerson’s chat with Anderson. That group pledged $32 million to the program.In their first season, the Sun Devils went 10-23-5, playing a schedule comprised of club teams, a Canadian opponent in the University of Alberta, Division III teams and Division I teams.This year, outside of Division III Southern New Hampshire and Canadian opponent Simon Fraser, Arizona State has a loaded Division I schedule. The Sun Devils have already played current top-20 opponents in No. 13 Notre Dame, No. 2 Harvard, No. 8 Boston College, No. 4 Penn State and No. 1 Denver. Arizona State has the luxury of comprising a difficult schedule being an independent program and not a member of a conference.Arizona State went a combined 0-9 against those teams, not to mention they face another top-20 adversary in OSU this weekend, No. 15 Quinnipiac and No. 14 Western Michigan before the season is over. Starting up a Division I program is not the easiest thing to do. Just ask OSU head coach Steve Rohlik, who was behind the bench when Nebraska-Omaha launched their Division I program in 1997. Teams around the nation stepped up and scheduled Omaha at the time, which made it a no-brainer for Rohlik to return the favor this season. “I think it’s good for college hockey,” Rohlik said. “I think the exposure to have them all over the country is good for everybody.”It could be a pipe dream, but a prominent ASU program could also be the first domino towards Pac-12 hockey.“They’re the face of expansion. Everybody is watching them. It could be the door to out west. I think all of us in college hockey are hoping for their success because we’d love to see this game grow,” Rohlik said.“I truly believe there are some schools out west that are watching to see what happens here. It’s viable that it could happen. I’d love to see something like that happen.”For OSU sophomore forward Mason Jobst, the feeling of college hockey adding a presence in the desert is an exciting one. “Any time you can add a well-known college like Arizona State, it’s a big step for (college hockey).” Jobst said.The Buckeyes, a bit shorthanded last weekend against Penn State, have a strong chance at getting the services of freshman phenom Tanner Laczynski back on Friday, fresh off winning a gold medal at the World Junior Championships in Montreal.He and his teammates expect the effort of a program trying to get a statement win.“I’m not familiar with the team, but I know that they’re going to come ready to work,” Laczynski said. “They’re going to try to come in here and beat us just like everyone else. This is a big game for them, they’re going to be ready to play and we can’t take them lightly.”Puck drop between the Buckeyes and the Sun Devils is set for 7 p.m. on Friday and 2 p.m. on Saturday at the Schottenstein Center. read more

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Report Top Penn State officials concealed critical facts about Jerry Sanduskys child

Former FBI director Louis Freeh’s investigation into Penn State’s handling of the Jerry Sandusky sex abuse saga has found that top university officials, including the late, former PSU football coach Joe Paterno, failed to take action against the child predator.PSU’s Board of Trustees enlisted the help of Freeh’s law firm, Freeh Group International Solutions, LLC, eight months ago and the resulting 267-page report condemned the hall of fame football coach, now-former university administrators, president Graham Spanier, athletic director Tim Curley and vice president Gary Schultz, to have concealed “critical facts” related to Sandusky’s pattern of child abuse.“Our most saddening and sobering finding is the total disregard for the safety and welfare of Sandusky’s child victims by the most senior leaders at Penn State,” Freeh said during a Wednesday press conference in Philadelphia. “The most powerful men at Penn State failed to take any steps for 14 years to protect children who Sandusky victimized.”The report also said that Paterno’s PSU football program treated Sandusky as a welcome and “valued member” after the now-convicted sex offender’s retirement from college football in 1999, which enabled him to continue to prey on children.A Paterno family statement, obtained by multiple outlets following Freeh’s press conference, said that the family appreciated the effort put into the investigation but did take issue with some of the final report’s findings.“(The conclusions) represent a judgment on motives and intentions and we think this is impossible. We have said from the beginning that Joe Paterno did not know Jerry Sandusky was a child predator,” the Paterno family statement read. “Moreover, Joe Paterno never interfered with any investigation. He immediately and accurately reported the incident he was told about in 2001.“It can be argued that Joe Paterno should have gone further. He should have pushed his superiors to see that they were doing their jobs. We accept this criticism. At the same time, Joe Paterno and everyone else knew that Sandusky had been repeatedly investigated by authorities who approved his multiple adoptions and foster children. Joe Paterno mistakenly believed that investigators, law enforcement officials, University leaders and others would properly and fully investigate any issue and proceed as the facts dictated.“This didn’t happen and everyone shares the responsibility.”Also in response to the release of Freeh’s report, NCAA Vice President of Communications Bob Williams released a statement which read: “Like everyone else, we are reviewing the final report for the first time today.  As President Emmert wrote in his November 17th letter to Penn State President Rodney Erickson and reiterated this week, the university has four key questions, concerning compliance with institutional control and ethics policies, to which it now needs to respond. Penn State’s response to the letter will inform our next steps, including whether or not to take further action. We expect Penn State’s continued cooperation in our examination of these issues.”Sandusky was found guilty on 45 of 48 counts of sexual abuse June 22 in Centre County (Pa.) Court. The 68-year-old former PSU defensive coordinator will likely die in jail as he faces a minimum 60-year and maximum 422-year sentence.Schultz and Curley await trial for perjury and failing to report their knowledge of Sandusky’s child abuse. As of Wednesday, a date has not been set for their trial to begin.Paterno died of lung cancer in January at the age of 85 and had not been interviewed for Freeh’s investigation. read more

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Ohio State athletics selfreports 22 minor NCAA violations in first half of

FootballImpermissible Phone Call Reported April 4An assistant football coach accidentally “pocket dialed” a prospect on Feb. 4 before they were eligible to be contacted. OSU sent an educational letter to the football coaching staff regarding phone rules in relation to contacting recruits. The letter specifically acted to remind the staff to make sure they lock their phones to avoid pocket dials in the future. OSU also had the coaches wait until May 1 to make their single allowed phone call to the recruit.Impermissible Publicity Reported April 7A picture of an assistant coach with a recruit was accidentally posted to Twitter by the coach. OSU sent the entire coaching staff a letter of education about recruiting and social media focused on Twitter. Warinner and director of player personnel Mark Pantoni were each sent a letter of reprimand by the university because they did not immediately report the violation. Further response from the NCAA is pending.Impermissible Publicity Reported April 9Warinner unintentionally posted what was intended to be a private message to a prospect on his Twitter feed. As a result, OSU had Warinner participate in a social media training session with the school’s information and technology office.Impermissible Publicity Reported April 22Meyer accidentally posted a message visible to the public on the Twitter account of a recruit’s mother. The Compliance Office went over the recruiting rules specifically related to Twitter messages with the coaching staff on top of sending them a letter of education. Any further response from the NCAA is pending. Women’s GolfPrivate Lessons to Male ProspectOSU women’s golf coach Therese Hession gave a private lesson to a men’s golf recruit. Women’s golf coaches at OSU will now have to fill out “private lesson request forms” and be approved for the lesson by the Compliance Office before giving the lesson. Men’s BasketballImpermissible Text Attachment Reported May 30A text-message attachment which was intended for recruiting purposes was sent to prospects Thompson and Esa Ahmad. The coaching staff was prohibited from sending electronic messages to either prospect for two weeks on top of receiving a letter of education. Thompson has since joined the basketball program while Ahmad is entering his senior year at Shaker Heights High School in Shaker Heights, Ohio. Women’s RowingMultiple Violations Reported June 12The women’s rowing team reported two separate violations June 12, one involving two recruits taking official visits and the other involving impermissible contact by a graduate assistant coach.One of the recruits was not put on the official visit request list before she arrived for the visit, while the other’s visit lasted longer than the 48 hours allowed by the NCAA for an official visit. The rowing staff was sent a letter of education by OSU and the Compliance Office provided the staff with a reminder of which hotels are technically on campus, and which are off campus.The other violation was reported after a graduate assistant coach with the program sent a direct Facebook message to a prospect. The university decided to disallow the coaching staff from contacting that prospect until Sept 15, which comes two weeks after they would typically be allowed to contact the athlete. OSU football coach Urban Meyer addresses the media at the 2014 Big Ten Media Days July 28 in Chicago. Meyer was involved with one of 22 self-reported NCAA violations by OSU in the first half of 2014.Credit: Tim Moody / Lantern sports editorOhio State football coach Urban Meyer and co-offensive coordinator and offensive line coach Ed Warinner were each involved with at least one self-reported NCAA violation in the first half of 2014.In all, OSU athletics self-reported 22 different NCAA violations, including six within the football program, from January through June.One of the violations related to the recruiting of then-recruit Trevor Thompson, who has since joined the men’s basketball program at OSU.Outside of football, the only OSU programs to self-report multiple violations this year through June are the men’s gymnastics program and women’s rowing. The men’s basketball program self reported one violation during the same time period.In total, the violations spanned across 15 sports plus one violation committed by the institution, with football having the most violations. Men’s gymnastics and women’s rowing had two violations each. 14 of the violations related to prospective student athletes.This information is the result of an open records request submitted by The Lantern July 8 which was released Monday morning by the OSU public records office.Violations were self reported by the university every month from January through June except for March, with the most reports coming in June when there were eight.Of the 22 violations, the NCAA deemed 10 of them needed no additional action after the University’s response. Eight of the violations are pending response from the NCAA and three from the Big Ten. Only one of the 22 violations has led to direct NCAA sanctions.That violation stemmed from a football recruit’s visit to the university from Dec. 13 to 15, 2013. The prospect and his parents, who are separated, were each reserved their own hotel room during the visit. The OSU football staff was unaware of the fact that the player’s mother chose not to attend the visit, and so the prospect’s brother checked into the room instead. The NCAA ruled the recruit ineligible until he repays the cost of the room, if that cost is less than or equal to $100. If the cost of the room was greater, the recruit will be ineligible until he is reinstated by the NCAA.Responses from the university included letters of education sent to coaching staffs, staff meetings with the assistant athletics director for compliance, a position currently held by Doug Archie, letters of reprimand and other assorted sanctions.A March 5 report by The Lantern details all self-reported violations from the beginning of the year through February, which totaled nine self-reports, including two by the football team. The last violation report in that article was dated Feb. 20. Since then, the university’s self-reported violations have spanned from April 4 to June 25. RifleryNumber of ContestsThe OSU riflery team initially scheduled 14 competitions during the 2013-14 season, while only 13 are allowed. The school had to cancel one previously scheduled match in order to fall back within the scheduling limits. read more

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Ohio State WCHA womens ice hockey set for new season

Then-freshman forward Katie Matheny (23) prepares for a face-off during a game against the Toronto Aeros on Sept. 28,2013, at the OSU Ice Rink. OSU lost, 2-1.Credit: Chelsea Spears / Multimedia editorWith a fresh season just around the corner, the Ohio State women’s ice hockey team is set to play in a new-look conference this year.Western Collegiate Hockey Association commissioner Aaron Kemp and OSU coach Nate Handrahan convened at the Ohio State Ice Rink on Wednesday to discuss the future of the WCHA and the Buckeyes’ plans for next season.Making changes to the WCHA’s Final Face-Off and improving the conference’s marketability are projects on Kemp’s agenda, he said.“We’ve got a good tradition of excellence and I don’t want to do too much to change that,” Kemp said. “I think we’re going to really put a focus on social media and trying to increase attendance at our championship.”Kemp, who joined the WCHA in June, spent the previous six years at Mercyhurst University where he was promoted to senior associate athletic director in 2011.“I think I’m bringing with me a hockey background as a coach, as a player and as an administrator,” Kemp said. “I want to really just help grow not only what we’re doing within the WCHA but also the larger picture, growing the game of women’s hockey.”The commissioner’s visit to OSU is part of what he called his “goodwill tour” of WCHA member schools. He met with the Buckeyes on Wednesday and said he plans to be a familiar face around the organization.“You’re going to see my face at a lot of the rinks this season,” Kemp said. “I want people to know who I am. I want them to know that I value and solicit feedback on how to better the league.”In his meeting with the OSU women’s hockey team, Kemp mentioned his plans to bring live entertainment to the WCHA Final Face-Off, the conference’s postseason tournament to be held in Grand Forks, N.D., junior defenseman Cara Zubko said.“I think it just got the girls really excited about this year and what’s able to happen” Zubko said. “I think (the Final Face-Off) really sparks for excitement on our team.”The WCHA has already moved its tournament from a Friday-Saturday schedule to a Saturday-Sunday schedule with hopes of increasing attendance, Kemp said.In addition to changing the format of the Final Face-Off, the WCHA may also introduce auxiliary events outside the games such as youth clinics, Kemp said.Kemp has experience working with postseason tournaments as he assisted with the organization of the 2003 men’s Frozen Four and direction of the 2011 women’s Frozen Four.While airing the Final Face-Off is not in this season’s plans, Kemp said he has contacted regional television networks about airing WCHA games in the future.Since the conference’s inception in 1999, WCHA teams have combined to make 24 appearances in the Frozen Four, the most among Division I women’s hockey conferences.“The WCHA is the best league in the country,” Handrahan said. “Every single night poses a new challenge for you.”In his fourth season with the Buckeyes, Handrahan is still searching for the Buckeyes’ first NCAA tournament berth.OSU went 15-17-5 last season, posting a 10-16-5 mark in conference play.“I’m pretty excited about the group as we come back,” Handrahan said. “We have to be prepared to play a pretty consistent game throughout the entire season just because of the quality of competition we have in our conference.”Handrahan said he hopes last season’s finish is an indication of his team’s direction. OSU went on a 9-4-3 stretch following winter break.The Buckeyes are set to open their regular season Oct. 3 against New Hampshire at the OSU Ice Rink. read more

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Opinion Loss of Noah Brown a blow but OSU has adequate replacements

Noah Brown (80) during a game against Illinois on November 1, 2014. Credit: Lantern File PhotoOn Wednesday night, Ohio State’s practice was halted early when sophomore wide receiver Noah Brown suffered a serious injury, later confirmed by an OSU spokesman to be a broken left leg that will cost the wideout the entire 2015 season.A standout in practices this offseason, Brown had essentially locked up his spot as one of the core wideouts in rotation. Many expected a breakout season from the 6-foot-2, 222-pound sophomore. Brown even dropped weight so he’d be a faster, better-rounded receiver that’d be capable of taking on a bigger role in OSU’s offense.Given the current news, it looks like Brown will have to wait another year to take on that role.Who will be stepping into his shoes is a whole new concern all on its own. Considering the Week One suspensions that were handed out in late July to redshirt sophomore Jalin Marshall and junior Dontre Wilson, both H-backs, as well as redshirt senior wideout Corey Smith, Brown’s injury only complicates matters for coach Urban Meyer and his staff.Yet, there are still plenty of options to turn to.With redshirt junior Michael Thomas already penciled in as the first-string wideout on the depth chart, seemingly all other slots below him are up for grabs as the Sept. 7 opener at Virginia Tech draws closer.A player whose career started out rocky because of injury issues, redshirt freshman Johnnie Dixon could fill in for Brown quite nicely. The former four-star receiver out of West Palm Beach, Florida, entered last season surrounded by hype and lofty expectations before knee surgery effectively ended those dreams early on. If healthy, Dixon can be a difference maker in the Buckeyes’ spread offense with his blazing deep-threat speed.A popular candidate who will likely be given the bulk of the work after Thomas is redshirt senior quarterback-turned-receiver Braxton Miller. The two-time Big Ten Offensive Player of the Year brings game-changing versatility and athletic capabilities unlike any other player on OSU’s roster. In other words, when Miller is on the field, there’s always a chance for a either a big play or a touchdown.Meyer all but guaranteed that Miller would start against the Hokies at the conclusion of practice on Saturday, saying that his “plan is to try to get him ready to do that.”Behind Thomas, Dixon and Miller sits a group of young playmakers filled with nothing but potential. Another converted quarterback, freshman Torrance Gibson, is learning the position and is off to a quick start in fall camp.Redshirt freshmen Terry McLaurin and Parris Campbell round out the replacement options. However, the coaching staff may lean toward giving significant minutes to more experienced players like sophomore H-back and backup running back Curtis Samuel, who spent a lot of time this offseason splitting out as a receiver.In any case, there’s ample time for Meyer and his staff to figure things out. Putting together a cohesive, winning combination of pass-catchers will be of the utmost importance when facing a defense of Virginia Tech’s caliber.However unfortunate it might be, Brown’s injury is not a terribly crushing blow to the Buckeyes’ offense. The team still has strong candidates to replace Brown. Maybe the most unfortunate part of the injury is that the Scarlet and Gray will have to wait another full year to get a chance to see the player coaches were setting up for a breakout season. read more

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Mens Lacrosse No 10 Ohio State ends regular season with 1310 loss

Ohio State sophomore midfielder Justin Inacio (30) faces off against Rutgers at Ohio Stadium on Mar. 31. Ohio State lost 6-14. Credit: Willow Mollenkopf | For The LanternThe No. 10 Ohio State men’s lacrosse team’s (8-4, 1-4 Big Ten) dreams of a Big Ten tournament and NCAA tournament bid were likely killed by arch-rivals Michigan (4-9, 1-4 Big Ten), when the Buckeyes lost to the Wolverines 13-10 on Friday.Ohio State junior attack and leading goal scorer Tre LeClaire, who has scored the 10th-most goals in the country this season, was out for the game due to an injury sustained in practice during the week. The Wolverines controlled the game throughout, having two players with hat tricks in senior midfield Brent Noseworthy and freshman attack Bryce Clay. Noseworthy scored his 100th goal of his career in the second quarter of his final collegiate game.r; The Buckeyes were in the game thanks to sophomore attack Jackson Reid, who scored five goals and sophomore midfield Justin Inacio, who won 22-of-24 faceoffs.Michigan’s first-half dominance was too much for the resurgence Buckeyes, going up four goals at the half with a lead of 8-4. The Buckeyes made a comeback early in the third quarter, but Michigan weathered the storm to get their first win ever against their rivals.The Buckeyes were inconsistent with shooting again, connecting on 10 of 40 attempts while Michigan made 13-of-28 on the day. The win breaks an eight-game losing streak for the Wolverines..Ohio State will have to wait and see if it earns an at-large bid for the NCAA tournament after its elimination from the Big Ten tournament. read more

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New Horatios Garden to open for spinal injury sufferers in memory of

first_imgHoratio’s Garden was set up in memory of Eton schoolboy Horatio Chapple, who died at the age of 17 while on an expedition in Svalbard, Norway when his camp was attacked by a polar bear.He had ambitions of becoming a doctor and had volunteered at the spinal centre in Salisbury, home to the first Horatio’s Garden, designed by Cleve West. It was opened in 2012. The charity was one of three featured in the Telegraph’s Christmas appeal, and was given more than a quarter of a million pounds by readers. The project also received support from a grant from Paterson Quarries Ltd. A third garden is planned for 2017 at Stoke Mandeville Hospital in Buckinghamshire.  The space was crafted by award-winning garden designer James Alexander-Sinclair, who described it as “the most meaningful garden I have ever designed”.It has six different spaces intended to stimulate the senses and provide a sense of wellbeing.The garden was built by a team of volunteers over the summer and includes a greenhouse, surrounded by raised beds and areas for horticultural therapy sessions.  The new garden is intended to stimulate the sensesCredit:Horatio’s Garden  Horatio Chapple His mother Olivia Chapple, the charity’s chair of trustees, said she was “delighted” at the gardening’s opening and “overwhelmed by the support we have received”.She added: “We have some wonderful volunteers already but are looking for more, so please get in touch if you are keen to help.” Olivia Chapple in the first garden in SalisburyCredit:Andrew Crowley for the Daily Telegraph  Olivia Chapple in the first garden in Salisburycenter_img The Telegraph’s Christmas appeal raised money for Horatio’s GardenCredit:JULIAN SIMMONDS for THE TELEGRAPH Horatio Chapple, who was killed in NorwayCredit:PA The new garden Telegraph Christmas appeal  A special therapeutic garden for spinal injury sufferers will be opened in Scotland this week after Daily Telegraph readers donated hundreds of thousands of pounds to support the cause.The courtyard at the Scottish National Spinal Injuries Unit at The Queen Elizabeth University Hospital in Glasgow will be the second ‘Horatio’s Garden’ in the UK and opens on 2 September. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

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Englishmen arent rude theyre just shy American WWII troops told

first_imgThe average Englishman may appear to be rude, unfriendly and at best a little peculiar, but not to worry: they are just “fundamentally shy”.Or at least that is what the visiting American soldiers of the Second World War were told, as part of a charm offensive from the British Council.A pamphlet, first written in 1944 and due to be republished by the Imperial War Museum, shows how American newcomers were inducted into the weird and wonderful ways of the English with an official guide.Among the tips in the leaflet include advice on overcoming their reserve, unleashing their inner romantic poet and even an explanation of why they are so obsessed with the weather. “All the country is green”, the British Council promises Written by a Thomas Burke, it notes: “The English have been called mad, hypocritical, impossible, ridiculous, cunning, simple and many other terms that, taken together, cancel each other out.”But many of their traits, it says, can be explained by their numerous overseas influences, variety of landscape and huge regional differences within a small amount of land.“Sometimes in one small corner the weather changes three or four times a day,” it notes. “That is why English people talk so much about the weather.” And although there are many aspects of English life unsatisfactory to foreign eyes: “No Englishman can defend these illogical customs, and he doesn’t try. […] He prefers to suffer and exercise his privilege of grumbling. It is all part of his individualism.”Although he is patriotic and heroic at heart, “he is outwardly serious only about trifles – about cricket, football, racing, stamp-collecting, gardening, golf, his dog, his car.”A spokesman for IWM said the book was intended to help the 1.5million American servicemen and women overcome the “culture shock” of being stationed in England, explaining the “illogical customs and stark contradictions” in friendly terms.The pamphlet was obtained by the Imperial War Museum after its publication in 1944 and has remained in its extensive archive.The English and Their Country: For Overseas Forces, is published by the Imperial War Museum in hardback from October 20. The author goes on to describe the main concern among foreigners meeting an Englishman: that he “turns on his frigidity and stiffness”.“But that reserve is surface only. It is a covering assumed by the Englishman to conceal the fact he is fundamentally shy. Yes – shy.”He is also, according to the British Council, “highly emotional and at the same time ashamed of showing emotion”, sensitive but trained not to show it, warm-hearted but nervous of exuberance, and indeed quite the sentimental romantic.While the people of the north are “blunt of speech and manner”, those in the south “cultivate the graces of life”. "All the country is green", the British Council promisescenter_img Cricket is "one of the things that matter to the average Englishman" Cricket is “one of the things that matter to the average Englishman” He prefers to suffer and exercise his privilege of grumblingThe British Council on Englishmen Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

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Squatters now own this house after proving they improved the property

first_img“The garden was very, very overgrown. We had to get it back to normal so it could be used.”The current residents of The Cottage, who include a flag-maker, a gardener and a seaweed harvester, host a number of projects at the property, including live music events and business workshops.Resident Emma Abel said: “I was living in a caravan which was hard, then I came here. It’s really nice. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Some of the squatters who moved into an empty South West Water property known as The CottageCredit:North Devon Journal / SWNS.com The COttage The Cottage is now home to nine residents living in a housing co-operative, each paying £320 a month towards the mortgage.Jef Smith, the sole remaining member of the original group who took up residence at the house, said: “I don’t like the term squatters. We reclaimed it. It was boarded up for seven years.“When we first got here, there was a lot of work to do. People had been dumping waste down there – there was a massive job just clearing it all. Credit:North Devon Journal / SWNS.com When squatters moved into this six-bedroom riverside house in Cornwall in 2003, it had been derelict for some time.Thirteen years on, the squatters are still there – but now they own the £300,000 house, known as The Cottage, situated on Falmouth’s picturesque Pendennis Headland.At one time South West Water, the previous owners, had sent representatives to evict the illegal tenants – but they changed their minds and allowed them to stay, on the basis that they were repairing and renovating the house. “To be able to buy the house is a relief and exciting. This is an amazing opportunity.”Mr Smith said: “The future is really exciting. It will take two years or more to fully restore it. It is certainly a hidden gem.“It is stunningly built and it has got so much character and potential.” Cottage residents Credit:North Devon Journal / SWNS.com The Cottagelast_img read more

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Bad news for farmers good news for children Brussels sprouts crop faces

first_imgI think at the moment we will be alright at Christmas, we will just scrape throughFarmer Dan Gielty For some, it threatens to ruin Christmas; for others, perhaps of younger generations, it is the promise of joyous relief.Brussels sprouts could be off the menu this year as the crop could be ruined by a plague of immigrant moths invading the UK.Supplies of the vegetable are already running low after several farmers’ festive crops were decimated by armies of the cabbage-loving diamondback insects.The warning comes after the biggest vegetable grower in the Channel Islands lost his entire Christmas supply to the pest – which is resistant to pesticides. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. A sprout farm in the Cotswolds A sprout farm in the CotswoldsCredit:John Lawrencecenter_img He said: “We have had significant crop losses with our sprouts and UK farmers have been hit as well. They have lost up to 25 per cent of their crops – and it’s all down to the diamondback moth.”We are going to have sprouts on stalks, sprout tops and flowering sprouts, and the early crop was OK. But it was the crop we planted to be ready for the Christmas market that we have completely lost.”Once the bugs lay their eggs, the eggs take around four or five days and the moths’ larvae chew through their leaves at a devastating rate – leaving just the veins.Farmer Dan Gielty, who grows Brussels sprouts near Southport, said that he had never seen so many of the insects as he has this year  but hopes enough of his sprouts will survive so they can “scrape through Christmas.”He said: “I have come across diamondback moths a few times but not the extent we had them this year. They hit our cauliflower and cabbage hard this year and it affected the quality of some of the Brussels sprouts.”I think at the moment we will be alright at Christmas, we will just scrape through.”The trouble is you cannot spray them [diamondback moths] so they’re hard to stop.” Mark Parsons, head of moth conservation at Butterfly Conservation, said: “The diamondback moth is an immigrant of this country and comes over in varying numbers every year.”It just so happens there was an unprecedented arrival of it in early June. But since that time they all disappeared and we have fallen back to typical levels.”These outbreaks happen from time to time over here. Occasionally you hear of fields affected by them. They are tiny little caterpillars and when in small numbers they don’t cause much damage.”For this much damage to be caused they must have arrived in large numbers and this farmer appears to have been very unfortunate and unlucky.”I am sure farmers are all aware of the issue and would notice a problem. It is very near to Brussels sprout season so I am sure any damage would have been done by now.”This is the first case I have heard about but maybe it could prove to be a wide spread issue.”Dr Steve Foster, of Rothamsted Research, said they have been working to try and find a solution to the problem.He added: “Hopefully there will be an Achilles heel and one of the insecticides available to growers will work out.”But if you haven’t got anything available what you can do apart from sit down and pray, because they are just going to destroy your crops?”A spokesman for the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs  said:  “While the number of Diamondback moths observed over the summer was higher than usual, we do not expect any significant impact on the availability of British Brussels sprouts this Christmas.” And now there are fears the insect – also known as a cabbage moth – could wipe the traditional trimming off the festive menu for families across the UK.The invasion is said to have already begun to hit British growers – with fears more could be on the way.Originating from the Mediterranean, when in their caterpillar state, the insects can devastate crops and target green leafy vegetables.They have arrived on UK shores in their tens of millions earlier this year – hundreds of times more than ever before.Charlie Gallichan, of Woodside Farms in Jersey, supplies fresh local veg to all the supermarket chains in Jersey and Guernsey and said the impact on his Brussels sprouts was devastating.After the outbreak he said he had no choice but to plough the crop back into the ground and cut his losses.last_img read more

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Body of British chef who died fighting Islamic State found in Syria

first_imgRyan Lock in a picture posted on his Facebook last OctoberCredit:FACEBOOK BREAKING NEWS! 3rd UK YPG Volunteer Dies Fighting ISIS in Syria – https://t.co/bHfVT97BhW https://t.co/QgHCUQkJYf #TwitterKurds pic.twitter.com/GNqpFPPSGG— Kurdish Question (@Hevallo) January 2, 2017 Ryan Lock in a picture posted on his Facebook last October Mark Campbell, a pro-Kurdish rights activist from KurdishQuestion.com, said: “Ryan’s remains are now awaiting repatriation to the UK.”He added: “It is hoped that with the support of the Kurdistan regional government authorities and the UK consulate in Erbil that the process will be able to proceed without delay, although due to the political complexities of the region we expect the process may take some time.”Ryan Lock’s parents, who are from Chichester, and Havant, in Hampshire, were said to be extremely concerned about the return of their son’s remains to the UK.The father of Konstandinos Erik Scurfield, the first British man to die fighting against IS with the Kurds, visited Ryan Lock’s father.Chris Scurfield said he had offered “all his help” to the family, and also told the BBC that the Foreign Office has now offered some consular assistance to Ryan Lock’s family in recovering him.A Foreign Office spokesman said: “The UK has advised for some time against all travel to Syria.”Anyone who does travel to these areas, for whatever reason, is putting themselves in danger.” The body of a British former chef killed fighting Islamic State alongside a Kurdish militia in Syria has been recovered, according to Kurdish activists.Ryan Lock, 20, from Chichester, west Sussex, died last month in battle near the northern Syrian city of Raqqa, the de facto capital of Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant ‘s (Isil) self-declared caliphate.After his death his body had been in the hands of Islamic State militants. The BBC reported that his body has now been recovered and taken to north-east Syria for an official autopsy.Mr Lock, who had no military background, left to fight with the Kurdish People’s Defence Units (YPG) military force last August after telling his family he was going to Turkey on holiday.In a message on Facebook on 31 August, he wrote: “I’m on my way to Rojava. I lied about going to Turkey. I’m sorry I didn’t tell anyone. I love all of you and I will be back in six months.”He became the third British man to die fighting with the Kurds against so-called Islamic State. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

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Contraceptive pill protects women against cancer for 35 years major study suggests

first_img Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. The contraceptive pill protects women against some cancers for more than 35 years after they stop taking it, the longest study ever carried out into the health risks has found.In recent years there have been fears that the combined pill raises cancer risk, but new research by the University of Aberdeen found that, for ovarian, endometrial and bowel cancer it actually has a strong preventative effect.Although there was a slight increase in risk for breast and cervical cancer, the study showed it was only a temporary rise and the danger vanished a few years after stopping contraception.The Oral Contraception Study was established by the Royal College of General Practitioners in 1968, seven years after the pill was first introduced into Britain on the NHS. It has followed 46,000 women ever since to monitor the long-term impact.It found that taking the pill for any length of time lowered the cases of bowel cancer by 19 per cent, endometrial cancer by 34 per cent and ovarian cancer by 33 per cent.  Around three million women are thought to take the combined contraceptive pill and charities said that it provided more evidence that there were few long-term health effects. Emma Shields, Cancer Research UK’s health information officer, said: “This long-running study adds to the evidence that the pill impacts a woman’s risk of cancer. Previous large studies have shown that the pill reduces the risk of ovarian and womb cancer but increases the risk of cervical and breast cancer.  “But, we also know that once a woman stops using the pill these increased risks start to fall back down while the reduced risk of ovarian and womb cancer continues.“If you are considering starting or stopping the pill, you should talk to your doctor.”The study was published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Although the pill slightly raise the risk of breast cancer, the increase vanished quickly after women stopped taking itCredit:Rex/Shutterstock It means that for every three women who would have developed ovarian or endometrial cancer, one has been protected by taking the pill. For bowel cancer around one fifth of cases were prevented through oral contraception. Around 35,000 women are diagnosed with the three conditions each year.“These results from the longest-running study in the world into oral contraceptive use are reassuring,” said lead author Dr Lisa Iversen.“They provide strong evidence that most women do not expose themselves to long-term cancer harm if they choose to use oral contraception; indeed, many are likely to be protected.“Because the study has been going for such a long time we are able to look at the very long term effects, if there are any, associated with the pill.“Specifically, pill users don’t have an overall increased risk of cancer over their lifetime and that the protective effects of some specific cancers last for at least 30 years.” The combined contraceptive pill works by tricking the body into thinking it is pregnant by delivering a surge of two hormones – oestrogen and progesterone – which cause changes in the reproductive system to prevent conception.But oestrogen is known to feed some tumours so there were fears that taking the pill could raise the risk of cancer in the long term. However the new research found the although the risk of breast cancer rose by four per cent for women taking the pill, it disappeared five years after stopping contraception.Professor Helen Stokes-Lampard, Chair of the Royal College of GPs, said: “Millions of women who use the combined oral contraceptive pill should be reassured by this comprehensive research that they are not at increased risk of cancer as a result – and that taking the pill might actually decrease their risk of certain cancers.“This is not to advocate that women should be given the pill as a preventative measure against cancer as we know that a minority of women do have adverse health effects as a result of taking the pill.“Ultimately decisions to prescribe the pill need to be made on a patient by patient basis, but this research will be useful to inform the conversations we have with our patients when discussing various contraceptive options that are available.” Although the pill slightly raise the risk of breast cancer, the increase vanished quickly after women stopped taking itlast_img read more

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London bus gets stuck attempting threepoint turn in manoeuvre described as Austin Powers

first_imgBank Station, near to where the incident took place A double-decker bus became wedged in a busy London high street after its driver appeared to have failed attempting a three-point turn.The red bus, which is operated by Transport for London, blocked the entire road, leading to a crowd congregating as the driver attempted to manoeuvre  out of the tight spot. Trapped close to Bank station bear the heart of the City of London, one onlooker captured footage on their phone showing a number of people attempting to push the bus back onto the right path.  Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Bank Station, near to where the incident took placecenter_img “The passengers didn’t seem to mind rolling up their sleeves and lending a helping hand.“People seemed quite amused by it all. Some were stopping and taking photos.“We stopped to watch for about 10 to 15 minutes, but I have no idea what happened after that.”“I imagine the bus would be considerably more difficult to manoeuvre, so it’s a good job Austin Powers wasn’t behind the wheel.” During the footage, which was later posted online, onlookers can be heard making light of the situation, with one describing it as a scene reminiscent of an “Austin Powers” movie. Adrian Brailsford, who witnessed the spectacle, told the Evening Standard:  “It was trying to do a three-point turn but the back mounted the kerb. The wheels were spinning round and round.“All the passengers got off and tried to get it moving again, as you can see, trying to push it off the kerb.last_img read more

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Johanna Konta reveals secret weapon in her locker to bring her Wimbledon

first_imgRolling Stones singer Sir Mick Jagger posted a photograph of himself playing tennis in the Seventies on Twitter, saying: “Great to see Johanna Konta make the semi-finals at Wimbledon. First British woman in 39 years.”The 73-year-old rock star added: “I never quite made it to a Grand Slam!” #Konta totally deserved that win. Was aggressor from start to finish. Controlled middle of the (centre) court so well. #wimbledon— Jamie Murray (@jamie_murray) July 11, 2017 Following her triumph, Konta praised her next opponent and paid tribute to the impact Venus and her sister Serena have had on the sport.Speaking after the match against Halep, she said of Venus: “As I’ve gotten older and actually played against her, played against my fellow competitors, that I actually have more and more respect for and more and more awareness for their achievements, and for what they’ve done for the sport.“It’s actually more now that I fully understand the weight of what Venus and her sister have given our sport. I think my appreciation for them I guess gets bigger now.” Great to see Johanna Konta make the semi-finals at #wimbledon first British woman in 39 years. I never quite made it to a Grand Slam! pic.twitter.com/o9JS8loTqX— Mick Jagger (@MickJagger) July 12, 2017 Andy Murray’s brother Jamie, who has reached the mixed doubles quarter finals with Martina Hingis, also tweeted his support: Her triumph in beating Halep was marred by controversy, when her opponent hit the ball into the net on Konta’s match point after being distracted by a loud scream from a woman in the Centre Court crowd.Halep said later that she had expected the umpire to replay the point, but he refused, giving Konta the set and her place in the next round on Thursday against five times winner Venus Williams.Following the match Konta acknowledged some of her support may have been “overenthusiastic”, but she thanked the Centre Court crowd for their vocal backing.“I’ve dreamed of success in every slam. I think it makes it more special because it is home. I do get that home support, which I don’t get anywhere else. In that sense, I guess it makes it that much sweeter,” she said. The 26-year-old, who moved to Britain from Australia with her Hungarian parents when she was 14, said: “I have had a teddy bear in my tennis bag since I was 11 or 12, so it has been in there for a good 15 years. It has a Hungarian name and doesn’t really translate to English.”Konta celebrated her thrilling triumph over the Romanian Simona Halep by posting a photograph of herself taken after the match with the former ballet star Darcey Bussell and pop singer Ellie Goulding, with the caption “post-match smiles”. Konta teddy @JoKonta91 We’d love to see you in Twickenham on Middle Sunday but heard you’re busy… congratulations & good luck! #Wimbledon— U2 (@U2) July 7, 2017 Konta has been inundated with messages of support since her historic triumph. U2, one of Konta’s favourite bands – she once said she’d remortgage her home go and see them live – have also tweeted their congratulations. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. No British woman has reached the Wimbledon semis since Virginia Wade in 1978, following her singled title victory the previous year. Johanna Konta shared this image on Facebook  along with the caption: ‘Bringing in the New Year with this handsome fella…’Credit:Facebook As well as natural talent, sheer determination and a team of top coaches to propel her into the Wimbledon semi-final, Johanna Konta has a secret weapon in her locker – a teddy bear.The British number one, who made history on Tuesday by becoming the first woman from this country to make the last four since 1978, has revealed she has kept the good luck mascot with her since she was a child.Konta, who faces five-times Wimbledon winner Venus Williams on Thursday for a place in Saturday’s women’s final, says she keeps the teddy with her whenever she plays.last_img read more

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The worlds first memorypowered Christmas tree

first_img Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Terminal illness charity Marie Curie hope that their memory powered Christmas tree will help make  the festive period a little bit easier for those dealing with loss.last_img

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Euston Station to become massive homeless shelter on Christmas Day

first_img“Stations are at the heart of local communities and we want to provide a legacy through good relationships with organisations like St Mungo’s and Streets Kitchen that supports the homeless community in and around our station long after the buzz of Christmas has died down.”  Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Euston station will open its doors to 200 homeless people on Christmas Day to offer them dinner and a place to sleep.The concourse will be filled with decorations and tables will be laid out to serve guests a full Christmas dinner for the first time.Around 30 volunteers from Network Rail will team up with homelessness charity St Mungo’s and Streets Kitchen to help run the event.The station was set to be empty, with no trains running across the network until after Boxing Day.Steve Naybour, head of transformation in Network Rail’s track team, said: “Using a station to give homeless people a Christmas dinner and some festive cheer is a great thing to do.“Thousands and thousands of my colleagues will already be working on Christmas Day to improve the railway for passengers.“Working on Christmas Day is pretty much par for the course for many of us who work for Network Rail but this year, because I wasn’t scheduled to work, myself and a handful of colleagues came up with this plan to feed some of London’s homeless instead.Joe Hendry, Euston station manager, added: “The station team is delighted to bring this unique event to life.  last_img read more

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